Rosetta@Home Project

What is Rosetta@home?

By running Rosetta@home on your computer when you’re not using it you will speed up and extend our efforts to design new proteins and to predict their 3-dimensional shapes. Proteins are the molecular machines and building blocks of life. You can read more about protein folding and design here.

Join Rosetta@home here

Join our team at Rosetta@home here

Quick guide to Rosetta and its graphics

Citizen scientists use Foldit to successfully design synthetic proteins

Citizen scientists can now use Foldit to successfully design synthetic proteins. The initial results of this unique collaboration are described in Nature.

IPD’s first nanoparticle vaccine

Researchers in the King lab, an affiliate of the Institute for Protein Design, published a report in Cell describing a computer-designed nanoparticle vaccine targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Although Rosetta@home was not directly used for this study, Rosetta@home volunteers provided computing for related research and development.

From IPD news:

Millions of children will visit hospitals this year, sickened by RSV. Infection is usually mild, causing only fevers, runny noses and frightened parents. But, in severe cases, barking coughs and painful wheezing can indicate serious respiratory complications, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia.

RSV is the primary cause of pneumonia in children under one and is therefore the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide after malaria. Although virtually every child on Earth will get RSV before the age of three, an estimated 99 percent of RSV deaths occur in developing countries. Despite substantial effort, there is not yet a safe and effective vaccine.

Today, an international team of scientists co-led by researchers at the IPD report in Cell a first-of-its-kind vaccine candidate for RSV. It elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus in mice and monkeys, paving the way for human clinical trials.

Ted talk with David Baker – Must see 10 min.

Rosetta@home News

  • With the recent COVID-19 outbreak, R@h has been used to predict the structure of proteins important to the disease as well as to produce new, stable mini-proteins to be used as potential therapeutics and diagnostics, like the one displayed above which is bound to part of the COVID-19 spike protein. To help our research, we are happy to announce a new application update, and thanks to the help from the Arm development community, including Rex St. John, Dmitry Moskalchuk, David Tischler, Lloyd Watts, and Sahaj Sarup, we are excited to also include the Linux-ARM platform. With this update we will […]
  • Thank you to all R@h participants who provided much of the computing used in a recent study published in PNAS describing the design of proteins that adopt more than one well-folded structure, reminiscent of viral fusion proteins. For more infomation, click here.
  • Thank you to all R@h volunteers for your contributions to help accurately model important coronavirus proteins. The collective computing power that you provide through R@h helps academic research groups world wide model important protein structures like these. From a recent IPD news post: "We are happy to report that the Rosetta molecular modeling suite was recently used to accurately predict the atomic-scale structure of an important coronavirus protein weeks before it could be measured in the lab. Knowledge gained from studying this viral protein is now being used to guide the design of novel vaccines and antiviral drugs." Since the […]
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